Mother & Child Health Care

Childhood anaemia

This study investigates the prevalence of anemia in young children living in the interior of Suriname and the influence of the associated factors age, nutritional status and ethnicity. Patients and methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 606 children aged 1–5 years from three different regions of Suriname’s interior were included, and hemoglobin levels and anthropometric measurements were collected. Logistic regression models were computed toexamine independent associations between anemic and nonanemic groups and to measure the influence of age, nutritional status and ethnicity.

Results: A total of 606 children were included, of whom 330 (55%) were aged 1–3 years and 276 were aged 4–5 years. The overall prevalence of anemia was 63%. Younger age was associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR]=1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.27–2.51). Anemia was less prevalent in Amerindian than in Maroon children (OR=0.51; 95% CI: 0.34–0.76). Hemoglobin level was not influenced by nutritional status nor by sex.

Conclusion: The prevalence of anemia in children aged 1–5 years living in Suriname’s interior is high (63%) compared to that in similar aged children in Latin America and the Caribbean (4–45%). Children aged 1–3 years were more affected than those aged 4–5 years as were Maroon children compared to Amerindian children. Nutritional status and sex were not of influence. 

Infection and sepsis in Surinamese neonates and children: epidemiology and novel diagnostic strategies

The focal point of this study is on epidemiology and novel diagnostic strategies in neonates and children with infection and sepsis. Collaboration with University Medical Center Groningen and Tergooi Hospitals, the Netherlands. 

Neurotoxicant Exposures: Impact on Maternal and Child Health in Suriname  

Evaluation of the presence of clinically significant haemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh-D antibodies in non-CaucasiansAssessing the impact of exposures to neurotoxicants on maternal and child health in Suriname while preserving the unique assets, health and cultural traditions of indigenous and other health disparate populations. Hypothesis: Neurotoxicant exposure, carefully measured in mothers, newborns and the environment, will contribute to increased negative birth outcomes and child neurodevelopmental trajectories. This is a combined research and planning grant of the Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (CCREOH), a transdisciplinary partnership among Tulane University, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, the Research Center of the AZP, and the Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Faculty of Medical Sciences.

The goal of this study is to evaluate the presence of clinically significant haemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh-D antibodies using umbilical cord blood samples. Collaboration with Leiden University Medical Center and Research Department of Sanguin Blood Supply, the Netherlands. 

Motor performance of children in Suriname born with a gestational age of less than 32 weeks and/or a birth weight less than 1500 grams and/or basirth phyxia

The focus of this study is to determine which factors contribute in the development of delayed motor performance of children born with a gestational age of less than 32 weeks and/or a birth weight less than 1500 grams and /or birth asphyxia with emphasis on cognitive/physical development delay. PhD project of a paediatric physiotherapist in collaboration with Radboud UMC, Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Research & Publications